Merry Christmas Mister Lawrence (1983)

Nagisa Oshima directs David Bowie, Beat Takeshi and Tom Conti in this WWII prisoner of war movie where the officers of both sides struggle with their desires for each other.

The Bridge of River Kwai but bubbling with gay lust, mainly unspoken. The film wobbles in a boarding school flashback sequence that gobbles up too much of the third act. Otherwise it is quite strange and beautiful, much like Ryuichi Sakamoto now iconic score. Possibly Bowie’s best onscreen performance.

6

Perfect Double Bill: Gohatto (1999)

Check out my wife Natalie’s Point Horror blog https://cornsyrup.co.uk

We also do a podcast together called The Worst Movies We Own. It is available on Spotify or here https://letterboxd.com/bobbycarroll/list/the-worst-movies-we-own-podcast-ranking-and/

One Missed Call (2003)

Takashi Miike directs Ko Shibasaki, Shinichi Tsutsumi and Kazue Fukiishi in this Japanese horror movie where an answerphone message from the future fortells your exact time of death.

Stale J horror with one stand-out sequence. The live TV event based around the countdown to one girl’s cursed end is pretty sweet and sustained. Everything else seems like Ringu scraps.

5

Perfect Double Bill: Ju-On: The Grudge (2002)

Check out my wife Natalie’s Point Horror blog https://cornsyrup.co.uk

We also do a podcast together called The Worst Movies We Own. It is available on Spotify or here https://letterboxd.com/bobbycarroll/list/the-worst-movies-we-own-podcast-ranking-and/

Role Models (2008)

David Wain directs Seann William Scott, Paul Rudd and Christopher Mintz-Plasse in this comedy where two losers become court appointed “big brothers” to a pair of wayward kids.

Easily one of the funniest Hollywood comedies of this century. Punch, punch, punch. Every performance lands. “You white, then you Ben Affleck.” Bobb’e J. Thompson is a particular find. Beyond the proven and very likeable leads this is teeming with comedy THAT GUY turns that are spot on; Jane Lynch, Ken Jeong, Ken Marino, Joe Lo Truglio. So we spend 10 minutes too many LARPing and then another 10 on sentiment at the end. When a comedy makes you laugh this much, this often, you can forgive it the excesses of its era.

8

Perfect Double Bill: I Love You, Man (2009)

Check out my wife Natalie’s Point Horror blog https://cornsyrup.co.uk

We also do a podcast together called The Worst Movies We Own. It is available on Spotify or here https://letterboxd.com/bobbycarroll/list/the-worst-movies-we-own-podcast-ranking-and/

Movie of the Week: Force Of Evil (1948)

Abraham Polonsky directs John Garfield, Beatrice Pearson and Marie Windsor in this film noir where a corrupt lawyer loses what little is left of his soul when he encourages his gangster client to consolidate the numbers racket.

One of my favourite film noirs. The tropes are slightly moved back to the middle ground and the little people caught in organised crime’s merciless grind are focussed on more prominently. The violence is shocking, the pessimism unrelenting. Beatrice Pearson, the good girl trying to escape the bad situation, gives a glorious performance. Shame she only made two movies. What happened there? The on-location New York shoot adds a little incongruous day light to the normally midnight set genre… the city looks fantastic, towering over the players like they are rats trapped in a maze with no escape.

9

Perfect Double Bill: The Grifters (1990)

Check out my wife Natalie’s Point Horror blog https://cornsyrup.co.uk

We also do a podcast together called The Worst Movies We Own. It is available on Spotify or here https://letterboxd.com/bobbycarroll/list/the-worst-movies-we-own-podcast-ranking-and/

King Richard (2021)

Reinaldo Marcus Green directs Will Smith, Demi Singleton and Saniyya Sidney in this biopic of Venus and Serena’s ambitious, committed and mercurial father.

How you approach this will define how much you appreciate it. A Will Smith vehicle that stretches him with both eyes clearly on Awards season? Or an inspirational biopic of the Williams sisters – the biggest names in tennis for the entirety of this century? I came for both, so was mightily satisfied, but if you just come for the latter you’ll need to be a tad patient as this is a movie far more focussed on the parenting than the match points. The somewhat extreme parenting. Richard Williams is clearly a fascinating figure. The Fresh Prince tries to dial back his natural likability and try to play him as Denzel might. Now Smith might not have to acting talent of Mister Washington but he certainly tries hard here and dominates the movie, battling to master the drama as much as the jokes. He’s certainly a Best Actor Oscar contender based on the psychologically complex portrait that is achieved. The second hour Venus’ agency and talent start to come to the fore. She starts pushing against her father’s protection of her talent, making her own decisions, playing for her self. We get there, to her story rather than his story, but it takes a lotta of movie for it to feel like that. This possibly spins its wheels a little too long before we get to “the big match”. If I was guessing why there is so much air and repetition here I’d wager it is a project that maybe has one overly invested executive producer too many. Yet there is tons of good stuff and fine stuff, nothing included is bloat. I’d certainly watch it again.

7

Perfect Double Bill: The Pursuit of Happyness (2006)

Check out my wife Natalie’s Point Horror blog https://cornsyrup.co.uk

We also do a podcast together called The Worst Movies We Own. It is available on Spotify or here https://letterboxd.com/bobbycarroll/list/the-worst-movies-we-own-podcast-ranking-and/

Ghostbusters Afterlife (2021)

Jason Reitman directs Paul Rudd, Carrie Coon and McKenna Grace in this legacy sequel where Egon Spengler’s estranged grandchildren inherit the mantle of Ghostbusters.

A fascinating attempt to appease the fans and trap a new generation to boot. The first hour was pretty magical… littered with Easter eggs and moments of genuine reverence to the beloved 1984 smash (don’t expect many references to Vigo, the Master of Evil). Then you realise it doesn’t really have much more in the tank but a replay of the plot of the first movie with a younger cast. And that’s fine. That’s OK. Strange to watch something that was so hip and urbane thirty five years ago be so smoothed out though. We end on a Marvel-esque big CGI swirl finale. The jokes are pretty soft. This is more Ghostbusters by way of Spielberg or Lucas rather than Ivan Reitman or SNL. The always welcome Paul Rudd gets a little left behind in the ultimate narrative but Grace and Logan Kim make for nice Muppet Baby substitutes for Ramis and Aykroyd respectively. The FX in the first half are wonderful. Would I have wanted a smidge more from the original cast? Yes. Should there have been at least one more Ghostbusting set piece? Definitely. As lovely as the reprises from Elmer Bernstein’s score are… why not a bit of sexy funk too? Really what I want is more of that original flavour! This is trying to be its own thing without alienating the fans. Mission accomplished and accomplished pretty safely. A fun afternoon at the movies that I hope the tween market it is also made for love quite as much as I do the originals.

7

Perfect Double Bill: Ghostbusters (1984)

Check out my wife Natalie’s Point Horror blog https://cornsyrup.co.uk

We also do a podcast together called The Worst Movies We Own. It is available on Spotify or here https://letterboxd.com/bobbycarroll/list/the-worst-movies-we-own-podcast-ranking-and/

The Mosquito Coast (1986)

Peter Weir directs Harrison Ford, River Phoenix and Helen Mirren in this adventure drama where an obsessed inventor breaks from civilisation and transplants his family to the tropical wilds.

Any movie starring Harrison Ford was a pretty big deal when I was a kid. I certainly watched this too young and impressionable in the Eighties with no idea it was meant to be taken as serious drama rather than a Han Solo in the jungle adventure movie. I found stuff to enjoy in it then and I find plenty to appreciate in it now. Ford is working double hard to not just rely on his natural charisma, and while he shows his effort a little too obviously, it probably is his best piece of screen acting. Brave for him to play such morally dubious character at that point in his career. Someone so reckless with their family’s well being is such a rarity on screen… not quite villain but certainly not the all American hero we are used to. Phoenix is great as our point of view for all the madness that unfolds as paradise turns to hellscape. Peter Weir leans into his on location shoot and this proves a pretty classy psychological attack on Western values. The Witness team of composer Maurice Jarre and cinematographer John Seale guarantee this sounds and looks superb. An underrated gem.

8

Perfect Double Bill: Fearless (1993)

Check out my wife Natalie’s Point Horror blog https://cornsyrup.co.uk

We also do a podcast together called The Worst Movies We Own. It is available on Spotify or here https://letterboxd.com/bobbycarroll/list/the-worst-movies-we-own-podcast-ranking-and/

Convoy (1978)

Sam Peckinpah directs Kris Kristofferson, Ali MacGraw and Ernest Borgnine in this action road comedy where a group of truckers begin protesting on the roads after getting a raw deal from the cops.

Bar fights. Sexy hitchhikers. Police brutality. This would have been marketed as a family movie back in the day. There’s a certain good ole boy bonhomie that is effective and some truly chaotic vehicle stunts. Feels a million light years away from what kids and adults get spoonfed as blockbusters now. The political and social commentary aspects are done better in things like Being There or The Sugarland Express but at least they are still present… you’d never imagine such a subplot in a Fast and Furious’s movie. Yet for an auteur film based around a novelty country song this is full of spunk and can be surprisingly hard hitting. I hear Peckinpah didn’t fully direct this one (one for them), allowing James Coburn to earn some behind camera experience while he went on coke and booze benders in his caravan. Fair enough, doesn’t show.

8

Perfect Double Bill: Duel (1971)

Check out my wife Natalie’s Point Horror blog https://cornsyrup.co.uk

We also do a podcast together called The Worst Movies We Own. It is available on Spotify or here https://letterboxd.com/bobbycarroll/list/the-worst-movies-we-own-podcast-ranking-and/

Battles Without Honor and Humanity (1973)

Kinji Fukasaku directs Bunta Sugawara, Hiroki Matsukata and Nobuo Kaneko in this Japanese faux documentary following the post-war power struggles of a new generation of yakuza in Hiroshima.

Lurid and relentless. Like watching a “Previously on The Yakuza Papers” recap that lasts a daunting 90 minutes. There’s plenty of violence and some likeable character do somehow emerge from the sprawl. But could I watch 8 further entries of this and keep my bearings at this pace of storytelling? Probably not.

6

Perfect Double Bill: Vengeance Is Mine (1979)

Check out my wife Natalie’s Point Horror blog https://cornsyrup.co.uk

We also do a podcast together called The Worst Movies We Own. It is available on Spotify or here https://letterboxd.com/bobbycarroll/list/the-worst-movies-we-own-podcast-ranking-and/

Dangerous Minds (1995)

John N. Smith directs Michelle Pfeiffer, George Dzundza and Courtney B. Vance in this high school drama based around the true story of a former Marine who takes control of a class of delinquents.

Gangster’s Paradise by Coolio is iconic. The movie it was attached to is pretty rote and unconvincing. If you want to see this subject matter handled well see Season 4 of The Wire. Michelle Pfeiffer holds her own among the musty, mawkish material but the best scene is where an old black lady puts her sexy “white saviour” ass in its place. A surprisingly profitable hit back in its day.

4

Perfect Double Bill: Blackboard Jungle (1955)

Check out my wife Natalie’s Point Horror blog https://cornsyrup.co.uk

We also do a podcast together called The Worst Movies We Own. It is available on Spotify or here https://letterboxd.com/bobbycarroll/list/the-worst-movies-we-own-podcast-ranking-and/